S.O.C.I.A.L

Emergent Enterprise Social Networking Use Cases: A Multi Case Study Comparison by Kai Riemer and Alexander Richter of University of Sydney Business School.  

This study includes analysis of a NAB case study.  A great conclusion:

Most notable however is that this network shows an elaborate and more pronounced idea-generation practice than we have observed in other networks. A closer look at the content of these conversations reveals the benefit for the corporation when viewed from an organisational learning perspective. For example, in more than a quarter of all instances employees brainstorm matters of corporate strategy, work philosophy, working conditions and sustainability. Furthermore, people engage in dis- cussions about their immediate work processes, exchanging ideas that can be influenced and implemented by the employees themselves. Interestingly, there are also a number of conversations about improvements to or developments of new products and other customer-related issues. Finally, people discuss ideas for personal (skills) development and workplace learning.

S.O.C.I.A.L

Emergent Enterprise Social Networking Use Cases: A Multi Case Study Comparison by Kai Riemer and Alexander Richter of University of Sydney Business School.  

This study includes analysis of a NAB case study.  A great conclusion:

Most notable however is that this network shows an elaborate and more pronounced idea-generation practice than we have observed in other networks. A closer look at the content of these conversations reveals the benefit for the corporation when viewed from an organisational learning perspective. For example, in more than a quarter of all instances employees brainstorm matters of corporate strategy, work philosophy, working conditions and sustainability. Furthermore, people engage in dis- cussions about their immediate work processes, exchanging ideas that can be influenced and implemented by the employees themselves. Interestingly, there are also a number of conversations about improvements to or developments of new products and other customer-related issues. Finally, people discuss ideas for personal (skills) development and workplace learning.

IDC profiles NAB’s use of social collaboration tools


IDC profiles NAB’s use of social collaboration tools

IDC profiles NAB’s use of social collaboration tools


IDC profiles NAB’s use of social collaboration tools

The knowledge revolution needs an assembly line

The industrial revolution was transformed by technologies like that of the assembly line which dramatically changed productivity and redefined the industrial model for a century. What will be the assembly line of the knowledge revolution?

From an era of mass manufacturing

Mass manufacturing arose when innovative manufacturing processes, such as the assembly line, arose to take advantage of the required capabilities like consistent & efficient power sources, better transportation, better communications and other technological advances. A number of large social changes came with the arrival of the era of mass production in the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries:

  • A shift from artisan manufacturing to factories & loss of power in the guilds (an end to skill as power) 
  • The management of work inputs in the right context and at the right time with less waste by bringing work to the worker, reducing work-in-progress & reduction of the manual effort through assembly lines and other manufacturing changes 
  • Specialisation and reduction in the task of the worker 

These changes also had a wider impact as the productivity and value created further social change, particularly as it drove a culture of mass consumption and the rise of the knowledge and service economy. Importantly, the development of this industrial revolution was largely guided by a purpose of shareholder return. With a few rare exceptions, employee engagement and fulfilment, environment or social purpose and other purposes often played a deeply secondary role.

Further phases of the mass manufacturing model whether robotics, lean/kaizen, logistics or outsourcing have been evolution on the basic revolution that began when production shifted from task oriented workshops to process driven factories. To a lesser extent, these efforts have sought to address broader social purposes.

To an era of mass collaboration

We are likely facing into a transformation of knowledge work on the scale of the industrial manufacturing. We are beginning to see new models of knowledge work and collaboration coming to life in our increasing social and digital information capabilities.

We now have the information storage and processing power, the mobility solutions and the social context that can drive insights and low-cost sharing. The coming together of these technologies offers us the opportunity to deliver information to knowledge workers when they need it (leveraging mobile and the cloud) with insight & context (from data analysis and social).

From entrepreneurs to large corporations the focus of innovation in the future of knowledge work is on how to develop new ways to leverage this technology. However for all the innovation we may not yet have seen a defining innovation on the scale of the assembly line. It cannot be far away.

By analogy, knowledge work will change dramatically in an era of mass collaboration:

  • Shifting the work from a knowledgeable expert to an digital algorithm, social network or most likely both (an end to knowledge as power) 
  • Reducing the search for information, the cost of sharing information and bringing knowledge to the worker as and when required for the task 
  • Provision of information in a richer more relevant context and with greater insight enabling new methods of the discovery, use and dissemination of knowledge, which is likely to mean new knowledge itself. 

Shaping purpose and outcomes

Managed with a focus only on shareholder value creation, this transformation could be massively disengaging and alienating for the knowledge workers of the global service economy. Managed with a focus on purpose (taking account of social value and economic value), this transformation could deliver massive productivity improvements, increased discretionary effort and an era of increased engagement and meaning in work.

Component parts of this transformation are being created now with innovation in enterprise social & cloud solutions, new mobile capabilities, big data and other innovations. The time to influence the direction and breadth of purpose of this innovation is now. The challenge that surrounds us is to develop the management innovations that will leverage these new capabilities to great social benefit.

The new era of knowledge work calls for its entrepreneurs and the simplicity & power of an assembly line for knowledge.

Do you agree? What would the assembly line for knowledge work look like? Can a broader and more balanced purpose guide this innovation in knowledge work? Which paths will we take as the knowledge revolution develops?

Concepts in this post borrowed from:

  • Richard Sennett, The Craftsman and Together
  • Clay Shirky, Cognitive Surplus 
  • Gary Hamel, The future of management 
  • Umair Haque’s HBR blog

The social enterprise must be social

A rush of social enterprise technologies is happening led by start-ups and major technology vendors. Everyone is racing to capitalise on the application of social technology into their application or process. Businesses are starting to realise the opportunity of social business processes with their people, customers and other stakeholders. Suddenly ‘social business’, the ‘social enterprise’ and ‘the future of work’ are hot topics.

In this hype and rush, one thing might just get lost – the creation of real community. The social enterprise must be social.

If you think this is an exaggerated concern, remember that technology does not create value. The value comes from how we use it. I have spent a lot of my time working with customer relationship management systems. In too many cases around the world, these projects are often cited as classic examples of failed technology implementations. Why? Most customer relationship management implementations have little relevance to customers and customer relationship employees. The efforts of vendors and businesses to wrap customers in process, data, leads and insight misses the opportunity to manage customers in a real vibrant profitable relationship. Business objectives get in the way of customer objectives and these systems fail their objectives and their users.

So how do we ensure that the social enterprise remains social?

Here are three thoughts:

  • Encourage real interaction: Questions and answers, back chat, push back, small talk, sports conversation, rapport building, jokes, laughter, entertainment, cynicism and mischief making are all part of the interactions that we have every day. Attempts to build systems or encourage use that exclude this ‘noise’ will fail to engage users. This ‘waste’ often has a real social purpose of creating engagement, enhancing productivity, building trust, sharing insight into others and deepening relationships. These are the gains that most vendors and businesses are looking to achieve by adding social features to their applications. 
  • Embrace community (that means culture, two-way communication, creativity, concerns and occasional chaos): Successful social technologies are built on real community. Successful community is what draws in users and allows the sytem to create value. The community will reflect the common culture of the organisation, the common ways of interacting and doing things. Working with community and culture demands that communication is two-way, creativity in the users is encouraged, community concerns are promptly addressed and the community embraces diversity and occasional chaos. You can treat people like children and lock-out these things with features, policy and tight control. However you will get a community culture that is sterile, users who follow orders and the productivity & engagement of a dictatorship. It is far more powerful to treat the community as adults and guide the culture of your organisation to the benefit of the business and community. 
  • Be part of society and social concerns: The best & most engaging social activity connects to a broader purpose. We all live and work in a broader society that makes decisions on what they think of us and our business. One of the powers of social enterprise solutions is the ability to bring that conversation into the workplace. Make the social enterprise one that can deliver social value beyond the bottom line. The employees, customers and other stakeholders who use the system are looking for this opportunity. 

Social enterprise solutions will need to deliver to business goals to have a continuing role in business. However, ensuring that these solutions create community by remaining human and social is critical to their success.