Simon Terry

Home » Future of Work » Use Inspiration: Work Out Loud

Use Inspiration: Work Out Loud

We are surrounded by inspiration for our work, for projects and for the development of new ideas. Every interaction, every conversation and every project is a potential source of inspiration. Working out loud is a vehicle to make more of potential inspiration.

There are two challenges converting our potential inspiration to action:

  • lack of attention and
  • a high standard of action

Lack of Attention

We are really busy. We roll from one challenge to the next. It is very easy to be task focused without time for reflection. However, we only notice the opportunities for inspiration if we are looking for them. We need to be alert and we need to create reflection time to consider how we can use the inspiration.

Working out loud is a way to bring more attention to our work. Working out loud asks us to think as we work about how our work can be shared purposefully and narrated to benefit others. That reflection on the nature of work helps us find additional moments of inspiration in and around our work.

High Standards

We are to busy to make a new idea perfect. We wait. The idea is usually lost because there is no time to make it perfect later.

Work in progress is never perfect. Work in progress is an invitation to a collaboration and a invitation to improve and develop the idea. Sharing inspirations as they happen pulls people in and can help advance the idea towards a more workable perfection.

We often worry about our ideas being better developed or leveraged by others if they are shared too early. However, every inspiration that is never captured, never converted to an idea or never executed is lost entirely. There is a big world out there and lots of ideas. Executing well and attracting partners to work with you is far more important to the success of your inspiration.

If you want to make more of your daily inspirations, work out loud by purposefully sharing your work in progress with relevant audiences.

 


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