Simon Terry

Home » Working out loud » Work Out Loud on Your Job, Your Career or Your Calling

Work Out Loud on Your Job, Your Career or Your Calling

In their book Creative Confidence, Tom and David Kelley describe the research of Amy Wrzesniewski of Yale University’s school of management. Amy Wrzesniewski has identified that people view work as either a job, a career or a calling. Whatever your view of work, working out loud can help.

Working out loud in a job

If you view work as a job, work is a way to earn money to pay for weekends, holidays and hobbies. Working out loud is a way to make sure you keep your job through recognition of your efforts and growing skill. Working out loud outside of work can take your hobbies to the point that they become a calling.

Working out loud in a career

If you view work as a career, then you are interested in achievements and promotion. Working out loud makes your work more visible. Sharing your work as it occurs accelerates people’s ability to appreciate your efforts. You can learn faster and build your skills in a network. Working out loud connects you with those who can help you find the next job opportunity.

Working out loud in a calling

If you view work as a calling, then you find work intrinsically rewarding. For this group working out loud is a way to connect with others who share the calling. Working out loud helps you build the community of peers that will take your work to a new level and a wider greater impact.

International working out loud week is from 16-23 Nov 2015. Put working out loud to work helping your job, your career or calling.


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